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Taerel:Rothia Berry Fields

Place
Place Name:
Rothia Berry Fields
Other Names:
Unknown
Biome:
Berry Fields
Size:
Unknown
Landmass:
Unknown
Discovered:
Unknown
First Settled:
Unknown
Controllers of Rothia Berry Fields in the following eras:
Stone Age:
Unknown
Copper Age:
Unknown
Bronze Age:
Unknown
Iron Age:
Unknown
Ancient Age:
Unknown
Middle Age:
Unknown
Early Modern Age:
Unknown
Industrial Age:
Unknown
Machine Age:
Unknown
Atomic Age:
Unknown
Space Age:
Unknown
Information Age:
Unknown
Genetic Age:
Unknown
Awakening Age:
Unknown
Shattering Age:

History

Rothia Berry Fields has always been a vast land filled with various berries. Over the course of its history, berry farmers have cultivated the land to be able to support the different types of berries. The first inhabitants planted berry seeds instead of flowers. They believed that there was greater profit in berries. For decades, this field has supplied berries worldwide. Every few centuries, ownership would change allowing all kinds of zu’aan to settle. This field was one of the many places that zu’aan headed for during the outbreak. With fertile soil, it had a constant plant based food source that drew on a variety of animals. So food was never a problem for this place.

Places like this, with viable food and water sources, drew on much conflict from several tribes vying for the fields. Ultimately, the zu’aan who would create Em’an City came out on top of the fight over the field. They were able to beat out all other tribes. These zu’aan gave the defeated tribes three choices. They could merge together so that everyone could share the benefits, but they would be under their control. The second choice was that they could leave and never return. If they returned, they would be killed. Or they could die right then. A majority of them left, deciding that it was better to try to claim other places like the field. A few of the smaller tribes joined Em’an as they didn’t want to try to face the kin’toni and survive on their own again.


They would prefer being under the control of other zu’aan than being killed by the kin’toni. The remaining ones decided to try their hand again at taking over. They were quickly defeated, killed, and their corpses were left for the animals to eat a couple miles away from the fields. Any other zu’aan that happened upon the field in the following decades were given the same choices. The zu’aan of Em’an City weren’t very knowledgeable about growing berries, as they simply wanted to settle somewhere with plenty of food. Due to this, they were extremely welcoming of zu’aan with agricultural backgrounds. With their help, they were able to properly grow and harvest the berries.

The amount of berries they grew were far too much for just them, so they reluctantly opened up trade with other cities. They traded for wood to build a wall around their city. They have also traded for tools and materials to make weapons in order to protect themselves. While they still had to worry about kin’toni, especially when they traveled to other cities for trade, they were well prepared. Since the field provided them with plenty of sustenance, they had plenty of energy to face them and make long treks. Most of the animals were small and herbivores, so they didn’t have to worry much about being attacked by carnivorous animals. Besides the berries, the majority of leftover plant life was either edible or posed no threat to zu’aan.

Geography

The Rothia Berry Fields covers over roughly 1,500 square kilometers. Hundreds of rows stretch for several miles, with breaks span around three feet. There are some hills rising a few feet rolling through the field to. Thousands of berries that taste sweet, sour, and tart fill up the hundreds of rows stretching over the field. These berries come in just about every color there is, along with varying sizes. Most of the bushes are barely waist high. While the berry bushes make up the majority of plant life in the field, there are other species of plants as well. Small leafy plants, bright flowers, and even trees. There are trees that produce sweet smelling flowers that are spread throughout the field.

The areas where these trees are planted are big enough to house small stations that zu’aan occupy to keep an eye on the berries. Since the field covers such a large space, each station is in charge of specific parts of the field to keep track of their growth and prepare the berries for harvest.Herbivores are attracted to the berries, and with them comes the omnivores and the carnivores who eat them. While some of the animals pose no threat to the berries, there are some that spoil them, pick too many, and destroy the soil that grows them. Zu’aan spend a considerable amount of time trying to get rid of them. There are some that help turn the soil as well. The holes that they dig lead to tunnels that allow the plant's roots to breathe and grow. This in turn allows the plant to thrive and become strong.


The field has a temperate climate with a moderate amount of rainfall. There are times where rain doesn’t fall for several months, but it doesn’t happen all the time. Summers aren’t extremely hot nor are winters extremely cold. They can still feel like summer and winter though. Summers are usually mild in temperatures reaching the low seventies during the day and high fifties at night. Winters can drop to the low fifties in the day and the low forties at night. Snow does occur, but it is not often. A small river lies towards its southern border that stretches further south, beyond the field. It has a width of about five feet where it enters the field and a depth of about three feet, making it big enough for fish to swim in.

This river provides the water they need to water the berries along with washing them. The zu’aan have made small streams branching off from the river. When it is time to harvest the berries, they place them in the streams. The streams carry them to the river. And the river carries them to a medium-sized, zu’aan made pond, where they are then collected. Thankfully, the minerals in the water work as natural purifiers. These minerals were washed into the pond as well. Both the river and the pond are given a chance to purify themselves before another washing.

Plants

Over eighty percent of plant life in the Rothia Berry Fields are made up of berry plants. There are varying degrees of sweet and sour berries lining the rows, along with just about every color there is. Some berries only grow during certain seasons, while others grow year round. There are hundreds of rows stretching several miles each. Aigro are giant light red berries that have a very sweet taste to them. They are shaped like a smooth sphere and grow in circular bundles. At least two dozen grow in each bundle and there are usualy about six bundles per bush. Many zu’aan prefer to sun dry aigro before eating as it enhances the taste even more. Aigro has a variety of benefits, including medicinal, to them.

They can be crushed and mixed with water to make dye. They can be used to combat fevers. Their anti-inflammatory properties make them effective for healing wounds. Aigro has the largest population as they are the easiest to grow. Igedil are medium sized berries that are a mix of sweet skin on the outside and sour fruit on the inside. They come in a variety of yellow, orange, and red. They’re shaped like tear drops. About twenty igedil grow per bundle. These particular berries grow on vines that climb up zu’aan made berry posts. Vines produce about two dozen bundles. Igedil grows year round. They have no medicinal benefits but they are a nice treat, especially for children.


Hogusberry are a small bundled mix of orange and white berries that have a strong sour taste to them. The white berries have a slightly stronger sourness to them. They have a stretched out, bumpy diamond shape. Each bundle has about a dozen berries on them and there are about twelve bundles per bush. Frosted edle are small blue berries that have a strong tart taste. They only grow during the winter and have a frosted look to them, which gives them their name. The top is shaped like a bulb that slims down around the middle before flaring out at the end. A single bundle grows almost thirty berries and nearly two dozen bundles grow on each bush. Most prefer to squeeze them into juice and mix them with other berries due to how strong they taste. They use them to ease stomach aches.

Sherwole are one of the few trees that grow in the field. They are placed sparingly throughout the field, taking up about half the amount of space that berries would grow in. They stretch up about twelve feet and have a wide trunk. Their rough bark is a silvery blue while its leaves are a deep blue. Dozens of small white, bell-shaped flowers grow on the tree. Their petals are shaped like stretched out triangles. Inside of the bell is a bright yellow center. These flowers are edible and have a sweet taste to them. In winter, the flowers don’t bloom and the leaves fall off leaving the thin branches bare.

Animals

Most of the animals in the Rothia Berry Fields are herbivores. A large amount of them come for the abundant amount of berries. The omnivores and carnivores follow them. Birds, rodents, insects, and small mammals make up the animal population. Many of the omnivores and carnivores are vital to this area due to them helping to keep the herbivores under control. Strovian are a breed of medium sized birds. They stand at around a height of almost three feet tall and have two sets of wings. The top set of wings have a wingspan of almost three feet across, while the bottom set are about two feet across. Their feathers are a mix of red, blue, and purple and have diamond shaped edges. To attract mates, males show off their wings.

The brighter and more intricately shown they are, the more likely the males are to attract a mate. After mating, females lay about four eggs. They make their nests in the sherwole trees growing around the field. Strovian are omnivores with diets consisting of sweet berries, small insects like the chatan, a berry worm native to Rothia. They will sometimes prey on small mammals like the yocuret. Chatan are long, purple skinned invertebrates that grow to a length of almost two feet. Often called berry worms, they can be found wrapped around berries. They have several rows of sharp teeth that can take a finger off if not careful. Many children have had their fingers accidentally bitten due to not seeing them.


Chatan are one of the species that destroy the berry field. They often leave holes in both the berries and the leaves around them, leading to the entire bundle spoiling. Strovian are one of the omnivores that actually keep most of the herbivores under control. Along with strovian preying on them, zu’aan can often be found eating them as well. Yocuret are small rodents that destroy the berry fields in their search for food. They walk on four short, stubby legs. They stand at a shoulder height of only half a foot, but can reach a foot and a half when they stand on their hind legs. Their tails are short, barely an inch long, and bushy. They have four stubby fingers that they use to grab the fruit.

Their short fur is coarse and a light brown color on top and white on their belly. Two small, pointed ears sit on their heads. Their diet consists only of berries, they have no preference between sweet, sour, or tart. Yocuret give birth to up to six young, and have a large population. They dig burrows around the base of the trees that have miles of interconnected tunnels underground. These tunnels have openings all over the field, which is what makes them hard to catch. As soon as one hole is covered, two more pop up. They usually leave a trail of berries leading to their holes. While they aren’t as bad as chatan, they could destroy the field if left unchecked.

Place
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Place
North:
Unknown
South:
Unknown
East:
Unknown
West:
Unknown
North-east:
Unknown
North-west:
Unknown
South-east:
Unknown
South-west:
Unknown


This article was written by Jenetra Waters and taken from Quyraness.miraheze.org Copyright 2020 Jenetra Waters "All rights reserved" unless otherwise stated. Permission has been granted by the author/s to have this page on the wiki. Takedown requests by the author/s will be respected. Please do not copy this article or any parts of this article and use it elsewhere.